Skip to main content

About your Search

20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
: as the country fast approaches the fiscal cliff, the two sides are talking past each other. democrats say they've laid down their marker hiking tax rates on wealthier americans. and it's up to republicans to propose specific spending cuts they want to entitlement programs. however, republicans say they've offered a concession putting revenue on the table. and they say it's now up to the president and his fellow democrats to feel some pain and propose cuts in medicare and medicaid. confu confusing? we asked senate majority leader harry reid. where's the disconnect? >> i don't understand his brain. so you should ask him, okay. >> from capitol hill to the white house, democrats say the major hurdle remains, the tax issue, whether republicans will agree not just to revenue but to raising tax rates. republicans as you will not be surprised have made clear so far that is a no-go. so what's next? well, a top republican aide told me they look forward to hearing from the white house. a top democratic aide saying, our door is open. read that, wolf, as a standstill. >> they've waited a few weeks before a
discussion of the fiscal cliff, given that is what lawmakers are talking about now. mitt romney just arrived here. we're not expecting anything huge to come out of this meeting. no appointment. for example, to the cabinet. but the president certainly, i think, hoping to engage in a serious conversation. this, as you point out, will be just the seventh time that these two have sat down after what was really a bruising fight during the election. this is really about sort of striking a tone of bipartisanship, helping these two former rivals to bury the hatchet but helping, i think the country to move forward, especially as we get closer to that fiscal cliff deadline. >> and ruth is here at the table. one of the issues could be the sort of backdrop the post-election comment by all sides not only mitt romney but also by stewart stevenson, op-ed his adviser. there was a time not long ago when the problems of the democratic party revolved arounding too liberal and dependent on minorities. obama turned those problems in advantages and rode that strategy to victory but he was a charismatic african-am
. if the fiscal cliff hits and nothing changes. as you go and look at the first group of folks here, talk about people who make very little money, up to $20,000 or $20,000 to $40,000. this yellow part represents the current amount of taxes folks are paying out there. if the fiscal cliff hits and nothing changes, this group would pay about $400 more. this group down here would pay about $1,200 more. that doesn't seem like a whether or not he will lot of money, but against that kind of income it's pretty big. move to the next category. if you go to $40,000 to $64,000 in income or $64,000 to $108,000, you see the green area's much bigger. that's because there are a lot of taxpayers like this. and they're paying a fairly sizable amount. but if they're out there and the fiscal cliff goes all the way through and nothing stops it, look what's going to happen. almost $2,000 more for this group. that's what you would have to pay if you're in that group. and look down here at the other one down here, $64,000 to $108,000, $3,500 more on that. and as you move up it gets even more so. go to this group, peop
of u.s. homeowners could get a financial hit if the fiscal cliff negotiations tweak a popular tax break. if the negotiators do that, the mortgage interest deduction could be on the table at those talks. christine romans has more now. >> reporter: don, the middle class's most cherished tax break could be in the cross hairs of negotiations. government spending on this will reach $100 billion by 2014 making it the third largest tax break on the books. who does it help? 41 million people. the most recent irs data shows 41 million people claimed this deduction on their 2010 tax returns. the tax return policy center says it tends to benefit upper middle class families the most. for those with annual incomes of less than $40,000, their savings about $91. or $5,500. this benefits people most on both coasts and cities like chicago with higher property prices. watching the fiscal cliff negotiations closely for what could happen next to the tax goody next year. don? >> christine, thank you very much. >>> okay. the fiscal cliff, you have heard vague warnings. let's get specific about it. your child
, the president offered a tough fiscal cliff proposal to congress, one that aides to john boehner say -- wait for it -- he's already rejected. of course he has. joining me to talk about all things politics, "new york times" columnist frank bruni and ross doufit. how many seconds was it, do you think, gentlemen, let me start with you, frank, before john boehner rejected out of hand president obama's attempt to try and do a fiscal cliff deal? >> with $1.6 trillion in new taxes, i think probably half a second. >> when you see the apparent attempt at a bipartisan lunch going on today between obama and romney, it was all very sweet and everything, the reality is the picture was about as uncomfortable as the relationship is between the two sides, and again, frank, how do we get to a better place in washington? how do we get these guys to realize, let me throw this at you. i interviewed mike tyson an hour ago. fantastic interview in many ways. what i found really fascinating and relevant to this, he talks about when he goes back to the streets he grew up in in new york, what real people care about.
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)